Calendar

* EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE *
Aug
6
Mon
ON VACATION! – UAH Closed for Vacation 8/6 – 8/22
Aug 6 @ 12:00 am – Aug 22 @ 12:00 pm

THE UPTOWN ART HOUSE WILL BE CLOSED FOR VACATION FROM AUGUST 6 TO AUGUST 22

Come join us for more great entertainment when we get back!

Aug
23
Thu
CHICK FLICK NIGHT – CLUELESS
Aug 23 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

It’s CHICK FLICK NIGHT at the Uptown Art House!

Thursday, August 23 we will be screening the hilarious ALICIA SILVERSTONE/PAUL RUDD comedy/chick flick, CLUELESS! And along with our cool selection of cold craft beers, popcorn and soft drinks, we’ll be featuring our Chick Flick Night Special of local wine, by the bottle, at $4 OFF!  Whoooo-hoooo!

Showtime is 7pm – Admission is $5 – UAH Doors open at 5pm – Come early and join us for a fun night out for the ladies!

“Is that low-viscosity rayon????” – Elle Woods

Aug
24
Fri
CHUCK HAWTHORNE & LIBBY KOCH
Aug 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

CHUCK HAWTHORNE & LIBBY KOCH will perform at the Uptown Art House on Friday, August 24 from 7pm to 9pm. Open seating tickets are $10.00 in advanced and $15.00 at the door on the day of the event.  Uptown Art House doors open at 3pm on Fridays. Buy TICKETS HERE.

CHUCK HAWTHORNE was sitting in a Chicago airport next to his guitar case. He had been visiting friends for the weekend and was waiting on a flight back to Austin, where he had recently relocated following his retirement from the US Marine Corps. Another gentleman toting a guitar took the seat next to him and struck up a conversation. That man was Juno Award winning artist Ray Bonneville.  As the flight boarded, the two exchanged contact information, and Ray asked Chuck to send him some songs. Chuck had heard that line before and figured that airport conversation would be the last he heard from Ray Bonneville. But the next day, he emailed Ray a few songs anyway. Ray sent a reply that would change Chuck’s life and career. It read, “Let’s meet for coffee and discuss your record.”The road that led Chuck to that chance airport encounter started on a cattle ranch in Amarillo and spanned the globe over 21 years of military service. Chuck developed his voice as a songwriter riding the Texas plains with his cowboy heroes Clifton Lowe and Alvin Hamrick, sailing the Adriatic sea and picking guitar aboard the USS Iwo Jima, writing Post 2 Gate in the basement of a Baghdad palace, and while experiencing the stories of the people he came to know in his hometown, his numerous deployments, and points in between. The 11 songs on Chuck’s debut album, Silver Line, were produced by Ray Bonneville at Shine Studios in Austin, Texas, and feature a roster of stellar guest musicians including Eliza Gilkyson and Gurf Morlix. The record recently caught the attention of Michael Martin Murphey, who heard Chuck play at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada. Murph has since invited Chuck to play shows with him at the Saxon Pub in Austin and the Franklin Theatre in Nashville, and along with Bonneville, he has become a musical mentor to Chuck.

Chuck Hawthorne is currently touring the country in support of Silver Line, which promises to put him firmly on the Americana map alongside the great songsmiths that now admire his work.

LIBBY KOCH – Texas Americana singer-songwriter Libby Koch (pronounced “coke”) is a “country meets soulful” (Free Press Houston), “feisty Texas songbird” (Country Music People) who “sings her story with a little twang, some slide guitar, and a lot of heart” (Texas Monthly). Libby is working on the follow up album to her critically acclaimed 2016 LP Just Move On (Berkalin Records). Working in Nashville with Grammy-winning producer Bil VornDick, she draws on legends from Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn to Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, among others, to craft “true cryin’ and leavin’ country songs.” Combining her country soul with a seventh-generation Texas troubadour’s storytelling skill, Koch fills her songs with intimacy and honesty. Like the most timeless country classics, they’re the kind that make you feel good about feelin’ bad.  Koch’s gospel-grounded and honky-tonk voice powerfully navigates the emotions inherent in an album about relationships, starting with the opening break-up trio, “Just Move On,” “You Don’t Live Here Anymore” and “Out of My Misery” — three diverse, retro-to-modern songs that ultimately convey more about the triumph of empowerment than the pain of loss. Tracked live with veteran players handpicked by VornDick, the album, her fourth, is a fine follow-up to her 2014 release, Tennessee Colony, which drew on her ancestors’ stories to address themes of family, faith and home. Calling it “a frisky blend of country, folk, bluegrass and gospel set to some mighty fine fiddle, banjo and mandolin” and labeling it “daisy fresh,” the Houston Press put Tennessee Colony on its year-end top 10 list. Though Houston native Koch began writing songs in junior high school, she never considered doing so professionally until she attended law school at Nashville’s Vanderbilt University, where she discovered she could hold her own in a city full of heavyweight talents. A job at a large Houston law firm convinced her music, not law, was her true calling, and eventually, she decided it was time to … just move on.

Just Move On earned Libby three first-round GRAMMY ballot nominations in the Country Solo Performance, Country Song, and Country Album Categories. 
Aug
25
Sat
Shad Blair – Singer/Songwriter
Aug 25 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Texas singer/songwriter Shad Blair was born and raised on a cattle ranch southeast of Post, Texas, learning to play guitar and sing from his dad and older brothers. He wore out his parents’ old country vinyl, spending the long Texas summers soaking up the music of Merle Haggard, Gene Watson, Johnny Cash, Bobby Helms, and Hank Williams. At age 14, Shad’s father taught him to play “Fraulein” and soon after he began playing gigs, later working in the oilfields to put himself through college. Over the years, Shad has created a sound hardened by life experience and steeped in his influences including Willie Nelson, Townes Van Zandt, and Steve Earle, to name a few.

Shad will perform in The Loft at the Uptown Art House on Saturday, August 25 from 7pm-10pm – Admission is $5 – UAH doors open at 1pm on Saturdays.

Aug
26
Sun
SOME LIKE IT HOT – Marylin Monroe
Aug 26 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The classic 1959 romantic/comedy starring: MARYLIN MONROE, TONY CURTIS and JACK LEMMON.  Directed by BILLY WILDER.

After witnessing a Mafia murder, slick saxophone player Joe (Tony Curtis) and his long-suffering buddy, Jerry (Jack Lemmon), improvise a quick plan to escape from Chicago with their lives. Disguising themselves as women, they join an all-female jazz band and hop a train bound for sunny Florida. While Joe pretends to be a millionaire to win the band’s sexy singer, Sugar (Marilyn Monroe), Jerry finds himself pursued by a real millionaire (Joe E. Brown) as things heat up and the mobsters close in.

Showtime is at 2:00pm – Admission: $5 Adults/$3 for kids under 12.  UAH doors open at 1pm on Sundays.

Aug
30
Thu
Melody Guy – Nashville Singer/Songwriter
Aug 30 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

“Melody sings with passion and beauty from the depths of her soul and writes from a real place that few writers rarely even touch upon. You’d have to be dead to not feel something when Melody Guy sings.” – Steve Seskin, American Songwriter

Melody Guy is a very talented songwriter from Nashville, TN who has had her songs recorded by Jessie James (“School Girl”) Amanda Williams, Sherrie Austin, as well as many independent artists. She’s had the great honor of singing the National Anthem for the Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball game August 5, 2011 in Pittsburgh PA and has performed to a standing ovation at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, TN.  Melody is a crowd favorite at the Dripping Springs Songwriters Festival and we’re very proud to have her back to perform again at the Uptown Art House.

Melody performs Thursday, August 30, from 6pm to 9pm – Admission is $5.  The Uptown Art House doors open at 5pm.

Aug
31
Fri
John Arthur Martinez – Singer/Songwriter
Aug 31 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

From the Sixth Street clubs in his birthplace of Austin, Texas to the Alpine festivals in Switzerland, from music venues in Paris, France to the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, john Arthur martinez has proven his music grades on stages all over. He acknowledges that he’s among the fortunate few that can make a living doing what they love, “I write, record, and perform songs. And, in doing so, I bare my soul, meet new souls, and see the world.” He’s celebrating the release of San Antonio Woman, his 13th album of original music–yes, 13th.

John Arthur performs in The Loft at the Uptown Art House on Friday, August 31, from 7pm-10pm.  UAH doors open at 3pm – Admission is $5

www.johnarthurmartinez.net

Sep
1
Sat
GARY P. NUNN & His Band
Sep 1 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Gary P. Nunn and his band will perform at the Uptown Art House on Saturday, September 1, 2018.  Showtime is 7:30 – Tickets are $25 General Admission and $40 Reserved with a Meet & Greet included in the Reserved price – $30/$45 at the door.  Uptown Art House doors open at 5pm.

Gary P. Nunn has been TAKING TEXAS TO THE COUNTRY and Texas country to the world for some 40 years now, establishing himself as an icon of Lone Star music. A founding father of the progressive country movement out of Austin in the 1970s that changed the face of popular music, Nunn is also an independent music pioneer who continues to oversee his own record label and song publishing companies, manage his own career (with the help of his wife Ruth), and play most every weekend at top music venues throughout Texas and beyond. His composition “London Homesick Blues” — with its internationally known “I wanna go home with the Armadillo” chorus — is a signature Texas country song that was the theme for the PBS concert TV show “Austin City Limits” for nearly three decades. It’s no wonder that All Music Guide hails him as “a Texas music institution.”

And now on TAKING TEXAS TO THE COUNTRY, Nunn continues to musically progress while staying true to his roots. It’s something of a travelogue in song that begins with a cosmic cowboy trip back to a love that once was on “Deja Vu,” and later visits a sorrowful “Denver” and a Cajun fais do do “Down To Louisiana,” plus takes a restful vacation along a “Mexican Boulevard,” and bops to a bit of Jamaican reggae on “It’s Not Love.” Longing for Texas travels the map on “One State of Mind,” while “Lonesome Lone Star Blues” tours the cities and towns of the Republic.

Along the way one meets a true Texan on “The Likes of Me” and a confirmed bachelor on “I’m Not That Kind of Guy.” Love is found just “A Two-Step Away,” and happiness comes every Friday night when “The Girl Just Loves to Dance.” The album finally wraps up with a message to Nashville about where country music still lives and thrives on the title tune, followed by the sweetly pleading closing devotional “The Rest of My Life.” And within its 13 tracks, Nunn and company touch on a spectrum of dance rhythms while the star of the show hits those emotional sweet spots throughout with his always warm and heartfelt singing

TAKING TEXAS TO THE COUNTRY was tracked at Cherry Ridge Recording Studio in Floresville by master C&W producer Tommy Detamore, whose pedal steel guitar is an instrumental highlight of the album along with the fiddle playing of Bobby Flores. It features three new tunes written or co-written by Nunn alongside numbers by writers like Johnny Divine, Levi Mullen, Steven Kundert, Michael Halvorsen and Gary’s brother Steve K. Nunn that he supports and promotes via his song publishing business. And the music arrives already “road-tested” by Nunn and his Bunkhouse Band. “If the band guys like a song and the audience responds to it, I’ll look for an opportunity to record it,” he explains.

“I’m still going strong and doing better than ever,” declares Nunn on the morning after he packed several thousand enthusiastic fans into The Hideout at the Reliant Astrodome to cap the first night of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. “The guy that runs the place told me, ‘Well, this is gonna be the best night. The rest of the guys are gonna have a hell of a time trying to top this.’”

Born in Oklahoma, Gary P. Nunn found his heart’s true home in the Lone Star State after his family moved to West Texas when he was in sixth grade. In the town of Brownfield just outside of Lubbock, he was an honors student, excelled in athletics, and started his first band soon after arriving. When he landed in Austin in 1967 to study pharmacy at the University of Texas, he presaged the “cosmic cowboy” movement to come with one of Austin’s favorite bands, The Lavender Hill Express, with the late Rusty Weir. After Willie Nelson, Michael Murphey and Jerry Jeff Walker all moved to town, Nunn was such a pivotal figure on the scene that at one point he was playing bass with all three artists. His talents on keyboards and vocals were also heard on many of the legendary albums from that era.

When Murphey arrived in Austin in 1972, he immediately asked Nunn to help him put together a band. While in London recording Murphey’s Cosmic Cowboy Souvenir album, two key events occurred for Nunn. One day in his hotel room, wishing he were back in Texas, he wrote “London Homesick Blues.” As Nunn recalls, “I just wrote it to kill time, and as a humorous exercise in writing a country song. I never thought that anything would ever become of that song. No one is more surprised than me at what it became.”

At Abby Road Studio, he also met an English music publisher who at the time had 90 songs on the British Top 100. It inspired Nunn to start his own publishing company when he got back to Austin to funnel songs he liked by songwriters he knew to the artists he worked with as well as others.

Nunn was a key figure in The Lost Gonzo Band when they recorded Jerry Jeff Walker’s landmark ¡Viva Terlingua! album, on which “London Homesick Blues” was a breakout hit. During his time with Walker, Nunn recalls, “I was fortunate enough to have some good songwriters come my way, and I channeled some of their tunes to Jerry Jeff. And they became some of his more popular songs, even today. I seem to have always had a knack for finding a tune.” And Nunn’s own songs have always served him well, being recorded by stars like Willie Nelson (“The Last Thing I Needed, The First Thing This Morning”)which hit #2, Rosanne Cash (“Couldn’t Do Nothing’ Right”), which hit #15 on the country singles charts), David Allen Coe and many other artists.

After four years and six albums with Walker, The Lost Gonzo Band struck out on their own in 1977 to record three critically acclaimed major label albums. Then in 1980, Nunn went solo when the Gonzos called it a day, and he hasn’t looked back since.

He started his own label, Guacamole Records, and was finally the full master of his own musical fate. His unflagging popularity in and around the Lone Star State has kept the houses full for 30 years whenever and wherever he plays. And Nunn has also made numerous visits to Europe, where he’s considered a Texas musical legend. Along the way he has appeared on TV shows like “Austin City Limits,” “Nashville Now,” TNN’s “Texas Connection” and many others as well as on national broadcasts of Texas Rangers baseball games singing the National Anthem.

In 1985, Nunn relocated to a family farm he inherited in Oklahoma, running an 800-acre cattle ranch at the same time as his musical career. He established the Terlingua North Chili Cook-Off and Music Festival there, where now popular acts like Pat Green and Cross Canadian Ragweed played early in their careers. “It seems every time we had a young and upcoming band up there, it was like they hit a diving board and just sprung into the air,” Nunn notes. And within today’s thriving Texas and Red Dirt music scene, he’s a revered elder statesman to countless performers and songwriters who teethed and grew up on his music. “They’ve let me know I inspired them and showed them how it could be done.”

In addition to the many gold albums on which he has played and/or written and published songs, Nunn has earned a number of notable awards and honors over the years. He was named an Official Ambassador to the World by Texas Governor Mark White, and years later Governor Rick Perry also declared him an Ambassador of Texas Music. In 2004, he was inducted into the Texas Hall of Fame, and he is also honored in the West Texas Walk of Fame in Lubbock as well as the Texas Department of Commerce and Tourism’s roster of Lone Star Greats who are leaders in the fields of art, athletics and music. As well, the Oklahoma House of Representatives recognized Nunn for his contribution to the preservation of the unique Southwestern style of music.

“The thing I’m proudest of is being a member of the West Texas Walk of Fame in Lubbock with Buddy Holly, Waylon Jennings, Bob Wills and Roy Orbison — guys who were my heroes. To me that’s just the greatest thing,” he enthuses. “And then today, turning on Sirius/XM radio and hearing myself played next to Hank Williams, Hank Thompson, Willie Nelson and Johnny Bush. I’m just so proud and pleased to be there among them.”

For Nunn, who in 2003 moved back to the Austin area, the secret to all his continuing success is deceptively simple. “My focus has always been on the audience and showing then a good time, and perhaps they will take a little Texas pride home with them,” he explains. “What I’ve tried to do is incorporate the musical genres that are indigenous to Texas, along with some neighboring styles. My goal is to paint as much of a Texas picture as I can with the music and just immerse people in that culture. I think it’s great, and I just love it and want to promote it.”

And now, more than half a century since he first started playing music, Nunn enthuses, “I’m having more fun now than ever. It just feels good. When you have a great band behind you and the audience is out there on the dance floor, you just say, ‘Yeah! This the reason I got into this in the first place.’ I love it more than ever.”

www.garypnunn.com

Sep
2
Sun
MR SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON – Classic Film Sundays
Sep 2 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

JIMMY STEWART, JEAN ARTHUR and CLAUDE RAINES star in Frank Capra’s classic 1939 film, MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON.

When the idealistic young Jefferson Smith (James Stewart) winds up appointed to the United States Senate, he gains the mentorship of Senator Joseph Paine (Claude Rains). However, Paine isn’t as noble as his reputation would indicate, and he becomes involved in a scheme to discredit Smith, who wants to build a boys’ campsite where a more lucrative project could go. Determined to stand up against Paine and his corrupt peers, Smith takes his case to the Senate floor.

Sunday, September 2.  Showtime 2:00pm – $5 Adults/$3 Kids under 12

Sep
8
Sat
PRIVATE EVENT – CLOSED
Sep 8 @ 12:00 pm – 12:00 am

The Uptown Art House will be closed all day, Saturday, September 8 for a private event.

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